In a Vase on Monday -Experiments

 This was my weekend to perform my version of the Chelsea Chop, which in my garden involves cutting back all the spent spring stuff and deadheading the roses. Yard waste toters are full.


 I  cut a lot of odds and ends for this weeks' vase- the Nigella seedheads are plentiful and in the dead middle I stuck a Allium christophii that had an encounter with (I suspect) a racoon, and along with a blob of chicken wire it provides the support for the arrangement




I  decided to try a few blooms I don't usually cut for vases-it will be interesting to see how they hold up. I'm especially interested to see what happens with the Phlomis -I have allowed that plant to get completely out of control and if the bloomed out flowers perform well they will make a good structural element all summer and into fall. The Phygelius 'Moonraker' is another of which I always have an ample (sometimes too ample) supply. The flowers on the plant don't hold that long, so I picked stems where there were few open flowers. We'll see how that goes. Verbena bonariensis is iffy too.



 The vase is Rumrill. This brand was manufactured from the early 1930s until Mr. Rumrills' demise in 1942. These vases are much more affordable than Bauer , however every one I have sweats  out of the bottom and thus I must  use a saucer under the vase. At least this one is matchey--it's from the Catalina 'Rancho' series of dinnerware.



 Be sure to visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden our hostess for In A Vase on Monday !

Comments

  1. I love the abundance of this vase, and experimenting is always a good thing, may you have happy discoveries.

    I have a friend (whom I used to hit the thrift shops with every weekend back in the 90's in Seattle) who has that same vase in white. I've always loved it. Your taking part in this meme might just push me to jump back in. So many vases in storage...

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    1. The inside is glazed green ..is your friends white one as well ?

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  2. Ah! That is very pretty! I have a similar vase that also sweats from the bottom, I wonder if mine is from the same maker. My Phlomis is flowering now too, I often forget about it as it's the other side of the greenhouse where I seldom go. I sometimes cut the dried stems in the fall for a dried arrangement that lasts all winter, or even longer.

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    1. Every Rumrill I have sweats from the bottom. They are all signed on the bottom-have you looked ? I like to use the dried Phlomis as well.

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  3. I love the vase and its contents! One can't go wrong with yellow roses in my book. I wish I could grow Phygelius but all attempts have ended with pitiful specimens - I suspect they don't like my perpetually dry sandy soil. My own Phlomis are mostly done but, if the blooms are cut early, I've found they hold up fairly well in a vase. I can't say the same for the Verbena.

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    1. I have Phygelius that took a few years to get any size. I was about to dig out my magenta-y one this year and it suddenly took off. But Moonraker would take over the whole garden if I let it. I have to dig up swathes of it every spring.

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  4. I adore the vase and the cuttings you put into it....especially the wonderful seedheads and roses.

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    1. Thanks Donna, I love using seedheads when I can.

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  5. Love the exuberance of your arrangement and the colour combinations!

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  6. A great arrangement. I love the idea of using the allium seed head down in the bottom like that.

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    1. I was surprised by how well it worked as a support.

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  7. The yellow and green is lovely and it's a good idea to try different things to see how they last. Let us know next week! I like all the textures. That's annoying for it to sweat out of the bottom, I've had that too and now have black rings in places I shouldn't.

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  8. Lovely art of arranginf flower vase ,Thanks for increasing my knowledge for flower arrangement.

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  9. That's a very attractive vase. I find the yellow petals fall quite quickly from the Phlomis but the remaining green seedcase is very attractive anyway either in its fresh green state or later when dried they can be sprayed to use for a Christmas arrangement.

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    1. Yes Christina, I would never attempt to use Phlomis in bloom, I don't think they would hold up. But the stems are so stiff and structural I think I will use the seedheads frequently .

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