Garden Bloggers Bloom Day - May 2019

  The possibility of rain is on the agenda  in the next few days , so it was good to get some photos of the roses while they still look good. I welcome the rain  even if it turns some roses into  blobs. Hopefully it's enough precip to allow  me to skip watering chores on the upcoming weekend, and the forecast is promising in that regard. Whatever the rainfall numbers this could easily be the end of it until fall. Of course it means more weeds-always a trade-off.

 Bloomday is hosted by Carol over yonder at May Dreams Gardens ; be sure to visit to seek out more floral action .

 Passiflora 'Blue Horizon' has exceeded expectations after failing to die back over winter. It's moving steadily into this NOID bush Fuchsia (that also stayed green all winter) and might be headed for the Birch adjacent to my front porch. Diligent observation and and possible intervention is called for. 


 This has been the very best year ever for Madame Isaac Peiere , a bourbon rose from 1881. There is no other rose that looks like it or smells like it . In another month it will be a rust and blackspot mess, but cutting back hard will be my solution since I don't spray.


 This is Sombreuil , a climber that continues to roam along the fence line. My favorite white rose.


 Lady Emma Hamilton, an Austin. This photo doesn't show off her wonderful red stems and bronzy new growth. 


 Clematis 'Juuli.'. This Clem is not twining so needs support. Love the bright yellow stamens.


 C. 'Arabella' another non-twiner . The big attribute here is the lengthy bloom season-well into fall.


 You can always count on Achillea 'Moonshine'.



Cenolophium denudatum. Bigger and better this year.




Parahebe pertifolia. I had one of these for years and I think I dug it out when I was trying to renovate my 'entry garden'. I missed having it so I acquired a new one last fall,and I have 2nd one coming mail order . A repeated element !



Another plant I used to have and planted again is Chocolate Cosmos. It will be a nice color echo for Sanguisorba tanna (no blooms there yet) and I like to use it in arrangements.
 I'

ve had this in my garden for three years-it pumps out the blooms, but I have a mental block when it comes to it's name. It starts with a C.I can't even remember the common name if there is one. It's a great plant, whatever it is.



 And here is one of my scented Pelargoniums (I collect them) and this one has been around long enough that he tag is long gone. You can just see the red veined foliage which is one of it's best features.


Those are my offerings this month--happy Bloomday to all , and hope to see many of you in Denver !

Comments

  1. Great selection of roses! I had 'Sombrueil' in my former garden and loved it. I have 'Lady Emma' now but it isn't blooming yet.

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    1. Lady Emma has been a standout for me-and doesn't grow to the gargantuan proportions that some Austins do in milder regions of California.

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  2. The yellow heavy bloomer is probably a Calylophus. Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. Calylophus it is. I have such a mental block on that name. Maybe I need to write it a hundred times !

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    2. It's Caly as in Calyfornia, and lophus as in us loaf around reading garden blogs instead of working. ;^)

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  3. Beautiful Clematis and I love the Roses!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

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    1. And happy BloomDay to you as well-May is always a great one !

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  4. Roses AND clematis - a match made in heaven. I wish either or, preferably both, did as well for me. My newly planted 'Lady Emma' (a DC Fling raffle win) was a bust last year but she has buds this year. Hopefully she'll grow stronger in time. I agree with Lass Leben on the ID, although I can never remember that name either - in this case the common name of sundrops is probably easier to bring to mind. Happy GBBD, Kathy.

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    1. I wish you well with Lady Emma--she's one of my faves -no blackspot and quick to re-bloom. You should perhaps consult with on the Clem thing Hoov, she seems to be able to grow them -but you have to water them and they are one of the very few in-ground plants that I fertilize.

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  5. Lots of beautiful blooms! I'm jealous of the passiflora, mine are trying to catch up...

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    1. I hope it wasn't a mistake -any vine that doesn't die back in winter is concerning -but those flowers !!

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  6. Every bloom is distinct and wonderful ...My favorite is chocolate cosmos which actually smell chocolate ...What wonderful collection of roses ...Have a great week ahead ...

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    1. I like my Choc Cosmos too, I planted another one last weekend. A great week ahead to you as well.

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  7. 'Mme. Isaac Pereire' is my favorite rose, and on my list to reacquire this fall (succumbed to a multi-year period of neglect a decade ago). If only more roses were so fragrant! Just learned this week that M. Pereire was a founder of Credit Mobilier; there are a lot of references to the Pereires in 'The Hare with Amber Eyes', Edmund re Waal's moving history of his family, the Ephrussis; they were neighbors in both Paris and Vienna.

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    1. There is nothing like Madame Isaac-I certainly wouldn't want to be without her . Thanks for the interesting back story, I will enjoy reading up on it.

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  8. I have Mme. IP in my garden ! It's just recovered after being moved . I planted it in honer of my favorite Botanical artist the late Rory McEwen , he did a lovely watercolor of this Rose.

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    1. I've edited quite a few roses out of my garden in the last few years , but not this one. It's a keeper.

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  9. Such beautiful flowers! I am tempted to plant a passionflower, they're so unique. Hope to see you in Denver, I joined at the last minute on a whim.

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    1. So glad you will be coming to Denver Alison ! Look forward to seeing you again.

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  10. Gorgeous. The Cenolophium denudatum particularly so, though being deciduous not sure it would like my climate. All the wonderful roses. I had MIP, and yes fragrance (not just the Rust), was at Turbo Gold levels.

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    1. They grow Cenolophium at Annies , not much chill there. Mine doesn't die back all the way-though last winter was pretty mild.

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  11. Wonderful floral bonanza! I've gotten interested in especially old roses in the last year or two. There are so many good ones, and I've learned that some of them even do well in shadier spots, which of course is golden info to a shade dweller like me. I cut back my Snow Queen passiflora rather hard since she was conquering the world, and I think she took offense and died. Can't see much life in her at all, which causes some regret. :(

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    1. I wish I had room for more old roses . I've had to be selective with my limited real estate., and my propensity to collect.

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