Tell the Truth Tuesday-Snails and Hail

 In February we got somewhere in the neighborhood of 9 inches of rain on the valley floor, and as always the hills that encircle us got several inches more. Rivers and creeks were swollen , our flood gates in the city were deployed and we were  spared the major flooding that was experienced by our  neighbors on the Russian River. It is gratifying to know the the decade long flood control project on the Napa River has in fact done exactly what it was meant to do-restoring wetland flood plains that direct the waters into safe spaces, and away from the city streets. I'm ready for some sun, and it looks like after the next series of storms we might have at least one full week that is dry. It will be a long time before I have to water anything.

 During the last big rain event we had 3 hailstorms in one day, and the results will be shared here for Tell the Truth Tuesday, the brainchild of our friend Alison over at Bonney Lassie. Snail damage will be included for unsightly-ness bonus points.

 The Mangaves and Manfredas were hit hard. This is Manfreda guttata 'Jaguar' . The white specks are the hail damage, and the remaining holes and scars were the work of my friends the snails.



 Here is Mangave 'Pineapple Express' similarly defaced. There's a bit of rot too, but the core is okay.



M. 'Pineapple Express' #2 did not fare as well. There was some standing water in this area (#1 is on a berm) so the plant -if it survives- will be moved to a higher-drier spot.



I've been babying this Mangave 'Kaleidescope' since I bought it in a somewhat distressed state on my Socal road trip last spring. It has been recovering nicely, complete with pups.It escaped the snails, but not the hail-thus the little white speckles.


 Apparently my ornamental kale had enough of the rain.



Graptoveria 'Fred Ives' has been a solid performer for a few years, but the entire (very large) plant is now pock-marked with hail damage.

 Another unfortunate Graptoveria.


 I was pretty happy with  Kalanchoe marnieriana . It sailed through every one of our frost events-which was unexpected- but the hail was it's nemesis. Soon after the snails moved in.The good news is this plant grows relatively fast for a succulent , so after frost I can cut it back to the ground and I think it will be ok.



I put several container succulents under a bespoke poly rain cover. I wish now that  had done this on a larger scale. Next winter there will be an upgrade.




 But the Hellebores look great.


 

Comments

  1. Oh, poor Mangaves and succulents! I don't think I realized till now how much damage hail can do. I hope they grow out of it quickly. The ugliness this time of year can be so disheartening. I covet your 'Kaleidoscope,' even with white speckles.

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    1. We do get hail once in a while Alison-but not this much ! Thank god I had my Agave 'Arizona Star' covered.

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  2. No, hail and succulents don't get along well. But maybe the growing centers are still OK? The last photo looks great.The hellebore has so many flowers. Is that a Euphorbia? It matches well with grass.

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    1. I think all the growing centers are okay, except 'Pineapple Express' number 2. Yes, that is a volunteer Euphorbia c. wulfenii ..you only need to plant it once !

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  3. so glad you escaped the flooding, but then there just had to be hail...a dismal situation saved by the hellebores!

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    1. It's been so damn gloomy up here -thank goodness for the Hellebores brightening things up . We are promised some sun on Friday.

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  4. Hail AND snails - now that's a hellish combination. Hopefully you've seen the end of the hail. Luckily, we've had only 2 minor hail events here in 8 years, although I know Denise, not so very far away, has been hit harder so I suppose I can't expect to avoid it indefinitely. The raccoons do a passable job of controlling slugs and snails for me, for which I guess I should cut them some slack when it comes to their more nefarious digging activities. It seems the predicted "atmospheric river" has just arrived here to start off what could be a heavy "weather event". (The city has actually installed electronic signs along the major roadways on the peninsula announcing a "weather event" requiring caution and use of lights.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We get the odd racoon in summer but they have never done any digging here. Maybe they are eating snails but if so the aren't doing a very thorough job. We are having a heavy rain event the next two days as well, but nothing like what we had last week. I did read on my go-to weather site (the National Weather Service) that the heavier moisture will be tracking south this go-round.

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  5. Hail is just plain awful. We get hail storms off and on, sometimes they wrap up before I bring the non hardy succulents out of storage, sometimes they wait until after. There’s just no telling which way it will go...

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    1. And what a sneaky trick on Ma Natures part to gift us with a mild winter and then stab us in the back in Feb--I know you are right in the same boat! At least I don't have snow.

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  6. Hails and Snails. Sorry. :(

    Better than drought?

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