Sunday, May 26, 2013

The Thyme Path


Garden -making sometimes presents us with disappointments-in my case usually a result of 'operator error'. We make plans, we design, we plant our design , and sometimes it just fails. Plants die, or struggle , or clash or just don't look the way we expect them to. I've probably tossed enough plants over the years to fill a small garden center.Success is a triumph for a pastime that presents so many variables over which we have little or no control. We are at the mercy of weather, sun patterns, and our neighbors trees. I've had plenty of happy results that were completely accidental and what a pleasant surprise this is , distracting me from that combination over yonder that looks like hell.

 The Thyme path is one of those accidents..I did plant the creeping Thyme at the edges of a bed and it was so many years ago I don't even remember the intent. I know that every other plant in the vicinity is in fact not what was there when it was was originally installed. The was in fact a very old and perilously listing Apricot tree on the right, long since gone. The Thyme has spread with abandon over what used to be micro redwood bark and stepping stones . Here you see it blooming in the foreground and and curving past the Briza media and Achellia towards the fence.





  Moving closer to the fence there are a few bare spots where traffic is heaviest.




Looking back from the fence ..I couldn't resist taking a photo of my favorite Penstemon, "Raven".




The Thyme continues in this direction and hangs a left at the base of Phlox paniculata 'David' and deadends at a robust stand of Eupatorium 'Gateway'. Though it is tempting to stroll this path barefoot, it is currently alive with bees and shoes are recommended. I am very pleased with this part of my garden , and the accidental Thyme has added an important dimension.


8 comments:

  1. The thyme pathway and plantings around it look lovely, and the scent must be lovely too!

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    1. I love fragrance and what a great bonus it is--part of the path has a spot of Chamomile, and there are a few roses to the rear.

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  2. I've done something similar with dymondia this year on an informal path like yours, just a track really through the garden. And included lots of yarrow too -- and penstemon again. What an odd coincidence. Amazing how satisfying these little paths are! Your garden is looking wonderful. Love it!

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    1. Thanks Denise ! Those yarrows are a no-brainer for me--they surely do pump out the flowers, and you can't beat a plant that could care less if it's 100 out. And yes, it is a track..does not meet the 2-person wide strolling criteria.

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  3. Isn't it great when everything just comes together?

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  4. Everything is beautiful Kathy. I love the thyme path. Must smell wonderful when WALATING in that part of the garden. I've never been successful with any kind of thyme. I must overwater and overfeed it or something. LOL

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    1. Thanks Deanne ! I have to say that I have not fertilized this area of the garden in years..in fact my fertilizer regimen is a handful of alfalfa meal on the roses when they break dormancy, and some Maxsea water soluble seaweed fert on the Clems a couple times a year.Other than that , only the containers get fed. The Thyme probably does not care for humidity or much summer rainfall either. So looking forward to seeing you next month !

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